Diabetes Care & Management

If you are looking for quality, affordable diabetes treatment in Sacramento, our team of highly-experienced, compassionate professionals looks forward to partnering with you. We want to help you live a healthy and productive life by focusing on your unique needs, regardless of your ability to pay.

When you visit one of our health centers, we want you to feel comfortable and to be a partner in your care.

Our team of medical specialists—including physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, dentists, psychiatrists, behavioral health therapists, substance abuse counselors, clinical pharmacists, and nutritionists—want to help you make life choices that will lead to your improved health. We offer a full range of services to meet all your healthcare needs.

Diabetes Care & Management in Sacramento

What is diabetes? 

  • Diabetes mellitus refers to a group of diseases characterized by the body’s inability to use glucose from the foods we eat. 
  • Glucose is an important source of energy for all of your body’s cells. Without it, the body cannot function properly. 
  • In both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, blood sugar levels will be high if untreated, because glucose cannot enter the cells to be used as fuel. High blood sugar levels can lead to serious, even life-threatening health complications. 

What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? 

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition in which the pancreas produces little to no insulin. Insulin is the hormone that is responsible for transporting glucose into the cells. This type usually has an onset in childhood or adolescence, although it can also develop in adults. 

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition in which the body has developed a resistance to insulin, so glucose cannot enter the cells. This is the most common type of diabetes, affecting 27 million people in the U.S. 

What are the risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes? 

  • Excess weight
  • Sedentary lifestyle
  • Race (It’s not clear why, but African Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans and Asian Americans are at higher risk)
  • Getting older 
  • Family history of diabetes
  • High blood pressure
  • High cholesterol and triglyceride levels 
  • History of gestational diabetes 
  • Polycystic ovarian syndrome 

What are the symptoms of type 2 diabetes? 

  • Feeling extremely thirsty
  • Increased urination
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Increased appetite 
  • Ketones in the urine (this is a serious complication that happens when muscle and fat breaks down to be used for energy in response to a lack of glucose in the cells) 
  • Fatigue
  • Irritability
  • Blurry vision
  • Wounds that are slow to heal 
  • Frequent infections

How is it diagnosed? 

Type 2 diabetes is generally diagnosed using the glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test measures your average blood sugar levels over the last 2-3 months. Because it doesn’t require fasting and it provides more information than one blood sugar level, it is considered the gold standard in diabetes testing. 

An A1C level of 6.5% or higher on two different occasions is indicative of diabetes. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4% signifies prediabetes. Below 5.7 is considered normal.

What is the treatment? 

  • Monitoring blood sugar levels. Checking blood sugar levels frequently (4 or more times a day) is the only way to make sure that your blood sugar level remains within your target range.
  • Insulin injections. While it is not necessary for everyone with type 2 diabetes, many patients need insulin injections. There are several types of insulin, including rapid, long, and intermediate-acting options. Depending on your specific needs, your doctor may prescribe a combination of different insulin types.
  • Oral medications. Metformin is the most common oral medication prescribed for diabetes type 2. This works by reducing the amount of blood sugar released by your liver and making your body more sensitive to insulin. Other oral medications are also available. 
  • Lifestyle modifications. While there’s no one diet prescribed for diabetes, eating a healthier diet that includes more whole foods and less processed foods, can go a long way in regulating blood sugar levels. Additionally, aerobic exercise can lower your blood sugar levels, while also increasing your body’s sensitivity to insulin. 

What are the complications of having type 2 diabetes? 

Excess sugar circulating in the bloodstream can cause tissue damage, eventually leading to very serious complications, including: 

  • Heart disease
  • Nerve damage (neuropathy)
  • Kidney damage (nephropathy) 
  • Eye damage (retinopathy)
  • Foot ulcers
  • Skin conditions and infections
  • Hearing impairment
  • Alzheimer’s disease

Diabetes management at One Community Health 

If you are looking for quality, affordable diabetes treatment in Sacramento, our team of highly-experienced, compassionate professionals looks forward to partnering with you. We want to help you live a healthy and productive life by focusing on your unique needs, regardless of your ability to pay. We accept walk-ins, or you can make an appointment by calling 916-443-3299.

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